Poverty, Policy, and Federal Administrative Discourse: Are Bureaucrats Speaking Equitable Antipoverty Policy Designs into Existence?

Non-elected, non-appointed federal employees, referred to as bureucrats, are among the many policy actors that participate in policy discourse. This article investigates whether bureaucrats’ administrative discourse promotes economic equality, as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. envisioned. Based on a qualitative analysis of data from congressional testimonies (n=34) before and after the enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, this study discusses the role of public administrators as contributors to welfare policy discourse and the resulting implcations for the fight for equality and equal citizenship.

Non-elected, non-appointed federal employees, referred to as bureucrats, are among the many policy actors that participate in policy discourse. This article investigates whether bureaucrats' administrative discourse promotes economic equality, as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. envisioned. Based on a qualitative analysis of data from congressional testimonies (n=34) before and after the enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, this study discusses the role of public administrators as contributors to welfare policy discourse and the resulting implcations for the fight for equality and equal citizenship.

File Type: 1111/13111
Categories: Equity, Public Policy