Burnout in HIV/AIDS volunteers: A sociocultural analysis among latino gay and bisexual men and transgender people

Understanding factors associated with burnout among HIV/AIDS volunteers has long-ranging implications for community organizations and prevention. Using a cross-sectional sample of Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender people (N = 309), we assess potential correlates of burnout identified by multiple theories, including factors associated with volunteering (experiences, motives) and contextual factors (stigma, sense of community). Reporting negative volunteering experiences was positively associated with burnout, while being motivated by personal HIV/AIDS experiences and having a greater sense of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people (GLBT) community was negatively related to burnout. The study highlights central challenges and opportunities to retain volunteers from marginalized communities.

Understanding factors associated with burnout among HIV/AIDS volunteers has long-ranging implications for community organizations and prevention. Using a cross-sectional sample of Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender people (N = 309), we assess potential correlates of burnout identified by multiple theories, including factors associated with volunteering (experiences, motives) and contextual factors (stigma, sense of community). Reporting negative volunteering experiences was positively associated with burnout, while being motivated by personal HIV/AIDS experiences and having a greater sense of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people (GLBT) community was negatively related to burnout. The study highlights central challenges and opportunities to retain volunteers from marginalized communities.

Categories: Human Resources, Org Theory